Reports

This Section contains IPAR Research Final Reports

Millennium Development Goals Progress Report Rwanda Country Report 2010

Millennium Development Goals Progress Report
Rwanda Country Report 2010

IPAR Rwanda, 2011

Disaffected and Delinquent Male Youth in Rwanda: Understanding Pathways to Delinquency and the Role of Rehabilitation and Vocational Skills Training

Disaffected and Delinquent Male Youth in Rwanda: Understanding Pathways to Delinquency and the Role of Rehabilitation and Vocational Skills Training

Ministry of Youth and IPAR Rwanda ; 2011

The Constant Quest For Solutions Throuh Dialogue and Consensus in Rwanda

The Constant Quest For Solutions Throuh Dialogue and consensus in Rwanda:
The Mechanism for Dialogue and Consensus


IPAR & Senate of Rwanda , 2014


RWANDA COUNTRY STUDY Raising Productivity and Reducing the Risk of Household Enterprises: Fieldwork Report

RWANDA COUNTRY STUDY
Raising Productivity and Reducing the Risk of Household Enterprises:

Fieldwork Report

IPAR Rwanda ; 2010

School Funding and Equity in Rwanda

This research assesses the impact on school funding of the direct financial parental contributions in two contrasting Rwandan Districts – one in a relatively better off urban area and one in a poorer rural area.

IPAR Rwanda ; 2012

Developing Customer Service Delivery:  Development with a Smile?

Developing Customer Service Delivery:

Development with a Smile?

 

IPAR Rwanda and RDB ; 2010

POOR CUSTOMER SERVICE AND ITS IMPACT ON THE RWANDAN ECONOMY

POOR CUSTOMER SERVICE AND ITS IMPACT
ON THE RWANDAN ECONOMY

IPAR Rwanda ; 2009

Rwandan agriculture sector situational analysis

The main objective of this review is to provide reliable situation analysis of Rwandan Agricultural sector and to recommend interventional strategies that would enable the government and her development partners to come up with sustainable interventions aimed at addressing the identified challenges. Eradicating Extreme Poverty and Hunger is the number one Millennium Development Goals which is becoming more elusive for various African countries because there is need to cut national poverty rate of each African country by 30% instead of current 60%. Such reductions can only be possible if agricultural sector contributions are accelerated in each African country especially sub Saharan Africa (UNDP, 2007).
The methodology of conducting this situational analysis took cognizance of the general consultations exercise popularly referred to as Stakeholders Engagement Exercise, which observed with concern that poor performance in the agricultural sector poses major constrain in Rwandan development. Policy documents of MINAGRI and other associated agencies were reviewed including their strategies and Business Plans. The aim of this first stage was to identify how all these, would fit into the general development vision of the entire country as enshrined in the vision 2020. The second stage was to interact with all key stakeholders in the agriculture sector, mainly those directly involved in the day today implementation activities. The main purpose of these interactions is to undertake overall assessment in the performance trend of their respective activities.
In Rwanda, agriculture has been performing well compared to other sectors of the economy. It should be understood that agricultural sector constitutes 90% employment opportunities in the economy and 70% export revenue in the country. On the side of provision of food, 91% of domestic food is generated by the agricultural sector. The review discovered that Agriculture in Rwanda is mainly subsistence with over 90% of output being food crops. Interestingly, 66% of the total food crops are meant for domestic consumption while only 34% find their way to the market. On the side of livestock, the growth has been reasonably steady at 7% per year especially on the side of goats.
In order to enhance sector productivity and to pursue the EDPRS benchmarks, the review made recommendations including Capacity Building to farmers on business skills and marketing strategies so that their participation may shift from mere subsistence to commercial farming. Observed also was low use of modern farming methods and inputs.

Against The Odds Achieving the MDGs in Rwanda

Introduction
In the last five years Rwanda has made dramatic development progress. There has been sustained economic growth and the signs of economic transformation noted in 2005 have been confirmed. There has been a continued growth in non-farm employment and a good performance in all economic sectors. There was an increase in non-farm employment and a consequence reduction in households’ reliance on agriculture for their income. Nevertheless by 2010/11 still over half of all households (55.9) relied on agriculture for their survival (Figure 1). Interestingly there was also a decrease in households dependent on non-agricultural income from 34.3 per cent to 27 per cent, driven by a decline in households dependent on non-farm self-employment, down by 10.8 percentage points. However, the latter was more than compensated for by the increase in households with diversified incomes, up from 3.3 per cent to 15.2 per cent - suggesting that there has been an increase in opportunities for farm and non-farm waged employment and that the number of households that are able to benefit from having income from more than one source of income has increased